John le Carre: Why I brought back Guillam, Smiley and the Cold War

John le Carre: Why I brought back Guillam, Smiley and the

Recently, John le Carre found himself sitting in the bleak banality of an old Stasi interrogation room in Berlin. It wasn’t much to look at: small, peeling linoleum, plain furniture.

Why John le Carré Brought George Smiley Back in A Legacy

Why John le Carré Brought George Smiley Back in A Legacy of Spies It’s been nearly 30 years since readers last met the legendary British intelligence officer.

Paul Davis On Crime: John le Carre: Why I Brought Back

John le Carre: Why I Brought Back Guillam, Smiley And The Cold War Nick Miller at the Brisbane Times offers on a piece on spy novelist John le Carre ad why he wrote a Legacy of Spies. Recently, John le Carre found himself sitting in the bleak banality of an old Stasi interrogation room in Berlin.

John le Carré: Why I brought Smiley back in from the cold

John le Carré, still writing with vigour at 85, knows that George Smiley still has something to say, more than half a century after we first read of his Cold War exploits.

George Smiley is back: John Le Carre’s Cold War character

John le Carré is bringing back George Smiley after more than 25 years, in new novel A Legacy of Spies.

John le Carré – Wikipedia

David John Moore Cornwell (born 19 October 1931), better known by the pen name John le Carré (/ l ə ˈ k ær eɪ /), is a British author of espionage novels. During the 1950s and 1960s, he worked for both the Security Service (MI5) and the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6).

Born: David John Moore Cornwell, 19 October 1931 (age 86), Poole, Dorset, England

Why George Smiley is among the richest, cleverest and most

Just as old Cold War tensions are ramping up again, John le Carré has brought back George Smiley On the other hand, it’s difficult to imagine a more perfect ending for the character than the

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold – Wikipedia

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1963 Cold War spy novel by the British author John le Carré. It depicts Alec Leamas, a British agent, being sent to East Germany as a faux defector to sow disinformation about a powerful East German intelligence officer.

Genre: Spy novel

The Glorious Return of George Smiley | The New Republic

The B2 is also the star of John le Carré’s 1965 novel The Looking Glass War. An agency known only as The Department wishes to restore its former glory as a player in the spying game.

John le Carré Goes Back Into the Cold – The Atlantic

John le Carré’s triumph (and consequent burden) is that he created characters and language so evocative of the spy world that they became more real in readers’ minds than real people or events.

Review: ‘A Legacy of Spies,’ by John le Carre

Now, 27 years after allowing him to shuffle off gracefully, Le Carré has brought Smiley back in an intricately plotted and richly satisfying new novel.