Rise in cannabis strength may not affect rates of schizophrenia, new study suggests

Rise in cannabis strength may not affect rates of

Rise in cannabis strength may not affect rates of schizophrenia, new study suggests Smoking cannabis has been linked with schizophrenia and 94 per …

Cannabis may not cause schizophrenia – Inside

Contrary to previous evidence, the rise in cannabis strength may not affect rates of schizophrenia. The question of whether using cannabis is associated with a risk of developing long-term psychotic problems, such as schizophrenia, has polarized researchers for years; several studies have …

Scientists Look at Why Cannabis Potency Does Not Affect

Studies concluding that cannabis use can induce psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, might need some updating. Although this topic is of great interest, the debate continues among psychiatrists over whether a cause-and-effect relationship between smoking cannabis and schizophrenia truly exists.

Cannabis harm to teenagers’ brains ‘overstated’, finds study

Rise in cannabis strength may not affect schizophrenia, study suggests the authors of the study published in the journal JAMA Psychology today, Enter your email to follow new comments on

Cannabis Strength Keeps Increasing But Schizophrenia Rates

Of course, cannabis use is common, while schizophrenia is relatively rare, affecting less than one per cent of the population. Even if cannabis use were to double the risk, over 98 percent of cannabis users would not develop schizophrenia. Researchers have to tread carefully in evaluating the evidence and avoiding scaremongering.

Dr Mike Hart – Science has shown that “cannabis induced

Rise in cannabis strength may not affect rates of schizophrenia, new study suggests Most people who smoke pot enjoy it, but a smaller proportion experience psychotic-like symptoms, such as feeling suspicious or paranoid.

Study Shows Cannabis Does Not Cause Schizophrenia

Especially among prohibitionists, schizophrenia has long been raised as a potential risk of cannabis use. But new research refutes this implied causal relationship and clarifies the relationship between marijuana and mental illness, showing that schizophrenia may lead to cannabis use — not …

Cannabis Use In Teenage Years Increases The Risk Of

New study suggests it increases the risk of schizophrenia in teenagers. Cannabis use during teenage years might trigger changes in the brain that increase the risk of schizophrenia, suggests a new study conducted by a team of researchers from the Western University in Ontario, Canada.

Cannabis-related Schizophrenia Set To Rise, Say

If cannabis causes schizophrenia – and that remains in question – then by 2010 up to 25 per cent of new cases of schizophrenia in the UK may be due to cannabis, according to a new study.

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4 Cannabis and schizophrenia: What does the research say?

in treatment for psychosis have high rates of cannabis use and cannabis use disorders (i.e. cannabis abuse and cannabis dependence) [133]. In the general population, individuals diagnosed as having a psychotic disorder have higher rates of cannabis use than those not …

If cannabis is getting stronger, why aren’t cases of

If cannabis potency is increasing and rates of schizophrenia are not, a similar third factor may explain this. Perhaps the answer is in those brief experiences we have when we use cannabis.

Teens Who Smoke Pot At Risk For Later Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia.com – Schizophrenia and Marijuana and Psychosis or Most people who smoke schizophrenia enjoy it, but a smaller proportion experience psychotic-like symptoms, such as feeling suspicious or paranoid. Rise in cannabis strength may not affect rates of schizophrenia, new

High potency cannabis | The BMJ

Cannabis may improve mood in the short term but at the cost of increasing psychotic symptoms, as young people with schizophrenia seem to recognise.12 13 A time sampling study suggests that psychotic symptoms more often follow cannabis use than the reverse.14

Cannabis and Schizophrenia: Trigger or Treatment?

Indeed, cannabis impacts the very system that research suggests has a major role in schizophrenia, the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in neurotransmission and helps to regulate