How to Calculate the Period and Orbiting Radius of a Geosynchronous Satellite

How to Calculate the Period and Orbiting Radius of a

When a satellite travels in a geosynchronous orbit around the Earth, it needs to travel at a certain orbiting radius and period to maintain this orbit. Because the radius and period are related, you can use physics to calculate one if you know the other. The period of a satellite is the time it takes it to make one full orbit around an object. The period of the Earth as it travels around the sun is one year.

Mathematics of Satellite Motion – physicsclassroom.com

The period, speed and acceleration of a satellite are only dependent upon the radius of orbit and the mass of the central body that the satellite is orbiting. Just as in the case of the motion of projectiles on earth, the mass of the projectile has no effect upon the acceleration towards the earth and the speed at …

How to Calculate a Satellite’s Speed around the Earth

The speed can’t vary as long as the satellite has a constant orbital radius — that is, as long as it’s going around in circles. This equation holds for any orbiting object where the attraction is the force of gravity, whether it’s a human-made satellite orbiting the Earth or the Earth orbiting the sun.

orbit – Given the orbital radius of a satellite, how is

Given the orbital radius of a satellite, how is the orbital period calculated? Ask Question. For example pick your unit of length as radius of a geosynchronous orbit. Use one sidereal day for the time unit. An earth orbit with 4 times geosynch radius would have a period of 8 sidereal days.

You could just solve your first equation for $T$. Simplistically: For a circular orbit orbital velocity is constant at $$\sqrt{(G/r)(M+m)}$$ So for orbital period: you know $r$ (also constant), so calculate the length of the orbit (circumference, assuming it’s a circle) and period is just length / velocity Notice for a given primary the only thing that really matters is $r$. Mass of the satellite (assuming it’s artificial) is kinda negligible ($M+m$) where $M$ is the primary. You are right about the geosynchronous orbitbut the period is determined by the radius props to HDE 22686 for adding the math graphics.Best answer · 3The orbital period of a satellite is solely determined by the semi-major axis of its orbit and the body it’s orbiting, specifically: $$T = 2\pi \sqrt{a^3/\mu}$$ Where $\mu$ is the gravitational constant of the body being orbited. For Earth, $\mu$ = 5.166 $km^3/hr^2$ (we neglect the mass of the satellite because the Earth weights about 1 hellagram ), and $a$ is the semi-major axis of the orbit, which is related to the radius (they are equal for circular orbits). If you solve this equation with the orbital period $T$ equal to one sidereal day , you can calculate the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit, which is at roughly 42,000 km.1Adam Wuerl has already given a good answer: $$T = 2\pi \sqrt{a^3/\mu}$$ This equation can be made easier to work with by choice of units. For example, if we use years and astronomical units, $\mu$ becomes $4\pi^2AU^3/year^2$ which cancels the figure outside the square root sign. Then we have $$T = \sqrt{a^3year^2/AU^3}$$ For example, suppose radius is 9 AU. square root of 9 is 3. 3 cubed is 27. 9 AUs, 27 years. 16 AUs, 64 years. 4 AUs, 8 years. Same trick can be used with other bodies. For example pick your unit of length as radius of a geosynchronous orbit. Use one sidereal day for the time unit. An earth orbit with 4 times geosynch radius would have a period of 8 sidereal days.1

Geostationary orbit – Wikipedia

A geostationary orbit, often referred to as a geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), is a circular geosynchronous orbit 35,786 km (22,236 mi) above Earth’s equator and following the direction of Earth’s rotation. An object in such an orbit appears motionless, at a fixed position in the sky, to ground observers.

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How does Kepler’s Third Law show how to calculate the

Aug 27, 2010 · Kepler’s Third Law relates period and orbital radius. If you know the radius, you can calculate the period. If you know the period, you can calculate the radius. For a geosynchronous orbit you want the orbit to be 24 hours or 86400 seconds. Actually you should use the sidereal day, 23 h 56 m 4 sec = 86164 seconds.

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orbital period of a satellite – YouTube

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Mar 28, 2012 · Speed of a Satellite in Circular Orbit, Orbital Velocity, Period, Centripetal Force, Physics Problem – Duration: 17:18. The Organic Chemistry Tutor 32,002 views

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orbit – Given the orbital radius of a satellite, how is

Same trick can be used with other bodies. For example pick your unit of length as radius of a geosynchronous orbit. Use one sidereal day for the time unit. An earth orbit with 4 times geosynch radius would have a period of 8 sidereal days.

Circular Motion, orbit and period? | Yahoo Answers

Nov 23, 2010 · Assume that a geosynchronous satellite has an orbital radius of 4.06 multiplied by 107 m. Also assume the geosynchronous satellite is orbiting a planet that has the same mass as the Earth. 1. Calculate its speed in orbit units: km/s 2. Calculate its period units: h Thankyou.

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Find speed of a satellite placed at geostationary orbit

From the relationship F centripetal = F centrifugal We note that the mass of the satellite, m s, appears on both sides, geostationary orbit is independent of the mass of the satellite. r (Orbital radius) = Earth’s equatorial radius + Height of the satellite above the Earth surface r = 6,378 km + 35,780 km r = 42,158 km r = 4.2158 x 107 m Speed