Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers of

Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers

Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers of enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens Jed W. Fahey , Yuesheng Zhang , and Paul Talalay PNAS September 16, 1997.

Published in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America · 1997Authors: Jed W Fahey · Yuesheng Zhang · Paul TalalayAffiliation: Johns Hopkins UniversityAbout: Indole-3-carbinol · Brassicaceae · Epoxide hydrolase · Dimethyl sulfoxide

Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers

Sep 16, 1997 · Crucifers (e.g., broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and Brussels sprouts), which are rich in phase 2 enzyme inducers , may play a special role in affording such protection (12, 13).

Published in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America · 1997Authors: Jed W Fahey · Yuesheng Zhang · Paul TalalayAffiliation: Johns Hopkins UniversityAbout: Indole-3-carbinol · Brassicaceae · Epoxide hydrolase · Dimethyl sulfoxide
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Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers

Brussels sprouts), which are rich in phase 2 enzyme inducers (11), may play a special role in affording such protection (12, 13). A simple cell culture system, developed to detect and quantitate the potency of phase 2 enzyme inducers, measures the elevation of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR; a typical

Broccoli Sprouts | Dr. Jed W. Fahey

(2010) Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) sprouts and extracts rich in glucosinolates and isothiocyanates affect cholesterol metabolism and genes involved on lipid homeostasis in hamsters. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 59(4): 1095-1103.

Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers

Preliminary experiments indicated that inducer potencies (expressed per g of plant) of extracts of young sprouts of arugula, bok choy, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage, collards, cress, daikon, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, turnip, and watercress ranged from 10 to 100 times those of mature field-grown plants.

Published in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America · 1997Authors: Jed W Fahey · Yuesheng Zhang · Paul TalalayAffiliation: Johns Hopkins UniversityAbout: Indole-3-carbinol · Brassicaceae · Epoxide hydrolase · Dimethyl sulfoxide

Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers

Brassica Chemoprotection Laboratory and Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205