Nick Tosches on Opium Dens

Nick Tosches on Opium Dens | Vanity Fair

Confessions of an Opium-Seeker; Email. Facebook. Twitter. As for opium dens, forget it. Nick Tosches is a Vanity Fair contributing editor. Share.

The Last Opium Den by Nick Tosches – Goodreads

Jan 05, 2001 · Nick Tosches trades civilization and its discontents for the possibility of one moment of pure bliss. Driven by romantic, spiritual, and medicinal imperatives, Nick Tosches goes in search of something everyone tells him no longer exists: an opium den.

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The Last Opium Den: Nick Tosches – amazon.com

Nick Tosches trades civilization and its discontents for the possibility of one moment of pure bliss. Driven by romantic, spiritual, and medicinal imperatives, Nick Tosches goes in search of something everyone tells him no longer exists: an opium den.

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The Last Opium Den – Wikipedia

The Last Opium Den is an investigative journalism/travel book by Nick Tosches. It was originally an article in Vanity Fair, where Tosches is a contributing editor. Tosches travels the world (in particular, Southeast Asia) seeking the titular establishment.

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA (USA)

“The Last Opium Den” by Nick Tosches | Salon.com

Mar 07, 2002 · Nick Tosches is butch. In «The Sex Revolts,» a book about gender and music, Joy Press and Simon Reynolds called him the «most unabashedly phallocratic of …

Nonfiction Book Review: THE LAST OPIUM DEN by Nick Tosches

In classic Tosches (Where Dead Voices Gather) fashion, the author offers an amazing recital of his around-the-world jaunt in search of the world’s last opium den.His ostensible purpose is sound: a

Nick Tosches (kottke.org)

In 2000, Nick Tosches went in search of something that he was told didn’t exist anymore: the opium den. In the early decades of the 20th century, as the drug trade was taken over by the Judeo-Christian coalition that came to control crime, Jewish and Italian names became almost as common as Chinese names in the reports of those arrested for smuggling, selling, and den-running.

Nick Tosches Searches for The Last Opium Den | Manhattan

Or, as Nick Tosches puts it, more succinctly, at the beginning of The Last Opium Den (Bloomsbury, 80 pages, $12.95): «Fuck this world.» This sort of bitterness sounds right; for it takes a streak of anger and disgust to spark any good drug mission.

Opium den – Wikipedia

Opium dens in China were frequented by all levels of society, and their opulence or simplicity reflected the financial means of the patrons. In urban areas of the United States, particularly on the West Coast, there were opium dens that

Nick Tosches – Official Site

“Nick Tosches’s extravagant and evocative biography is a superbly told story that makes sense of the wildest, most messed-up survivor in the history of rock ’n’ roll. They don’t make them like that any more. And, perhaps for that very reason, they don’t write them like that anymore. [The Last Opium Den…

44 best opium dens images on Pinterest | Opium den

Drug Dens: 10 Urban Underworlds of the Opium Age Find this Pin and more on opium dens by Bob Percival. Opium Den in Chinatown, Calcutta At the height of its popularity in the century, opium was sold and smoked communally in small rooms operated by Chinese immigrants.

Last Opium Den by Nick Tosches, Hardcover – Barnes & Noble

Nick Tosches trades civilization and its discontents for the possibility of one moment of pure bliss. Driven by romantic, spiritual, and medicinal imperatives, Nick Tosches goes in search of something everyone tells him no longer exists: an opium den.

Opiate of the Masses – NYMag

In the September Vanity Fair, Nick Tosches goes on a thirteen-page quest for the brocade-curtained opium den of his dreams. With excuses in hand from his doctor and his priest, he drains his

Nick Tosches | Vanity Fair

Nick Tosches His articles for the magazine have included profiles of Ed Sullivan, reputed mafia lawyer Sidney Korshak, and boxer Sonny Liston, and a report on his search for the world’s last

Book Review: The Last Opium Den | Alternet

Tough-guy writer Nick Tosches elegantly mourns the vanishing of a decadent icon. Michelle Goldberg writes that she «knows from my own blissful experience that the opium den lives on.» Nick Tosches